International Women's Health + Human Rights

We are a global community dedicated to education and collaborative action on issues of International Women's Health & Human Rights. This is the Tumblr page for the massive open online course (MOOC), featuring Anne Firth Murray, the founding president of the Global Fund for Women and an educator at Stanford University. Visit www.internationalwomenshealth.org for more information.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Joffrey Monnier/MSF

Jannette is the first pregnant woman known to have survived Ebola in Guéckédou, Guinea, during the current outbreak. She arrived seven months pregnant with her sixth child at the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Ebola treatment center in Guéckédou. Her prognosis was not good. Up until then, no pregnant woman had survived Ebola, but Jannette slowly started to recover.

After a few days her baby stopped moving. Medical staff confirmed the fetus was dead. A blood test showed that Jannette was cured and was testing Ebola-negative, but there was a risk that the baby might have been infected. Luckily, there was an obstetrician in the MSF medical team. She tested the amniotic fluid, and the results showed Ebola-positive. Jannette was cured, but her stillborn baby was still contagious.
Considering the risks of contagion linked to an unprotected delivery, the medical team had no choice but to proceed with the delivery inside the Ebola isolation structure. Jannette survived and went on to make a full recovery. Today she is cured and regularly comes to visit the medical team at the Ebola treatment center. Her village, Houdouni, suffered heavy losses due to the disease. Of the 110 official residents, 23 died of Ebola and only five, including Jannette, survived.

globalvoices:

The second kissing sit-in, or “besada” in Spanish, attracted protested the country’s New Cuban Labor Code, which excludes gender identity as a motive for workplace discrimination.

These Cubans Are Puckering Up in Support of LGBT Rights

humanrightsupdates:

“In the Middle East, the war is obvious. We can see the physical destruction of buildings and deaths of people.
But in Latin America, the war is different: it is one waged against poverty, hunger and a violence rooted in corruption which targets people who express their own ideas.
It is a silent war against the impunity of recent years. It is a fight for a fair society.
Corrupt legal systems, corrupted media and impunity for the torturers and killers of the 1980s are phenomena to be found across Latin America.
Journalists here only have two options: you are either for or against the oppressed.
If we can get into the shoes of those who are suffering, we will feel their pain and will be moved to do something.” [x], picture quote [x]
Human rights defenders in their own words: journalist Dina Meza, Honduras. 

humanrightsupdates:

In the Middle East, the war is obvious. We can see the physical destruction of buildings and deaths of people.

But in Latin America, the war is different: it is one waged against poverty, hunger and a violence rooted in corruption which targets people who express their own ideas.

It is a silent war against the impunity of recent years. It is a fight for a fair society.

Corrupt legal systems, corrupted media and impunity for the torturers and killers of the 1980s are phenomena to be found across Latin America.

Journalists here only have two options: you are either for or against the oppressed.

If we can get into the shoes of those who are suffering, we will feel their pain and will be moved to do something.” [x], picture quote [x]

Human rights defenders in their own words: journalist Dina Meza, Honduras. 

awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.

although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture.

despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.

these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.

(via ourafrica)

msnbc:

Lucy Flores was born into an impoverished family of 13 children, abandoned by her mother in grade school, fell into a gang, was sentenced to youth prison, and dropped out of high school. Now, she’s a lawyer and legislator, and currently running for Lieutenant Governor of Nevada. 

“There are Lucys in every town across this state. That’s why my focus is on making sure that this is a state that works for every Nevadan, not just the privileged few.”

Read msnbc’s exclusive profile of rising political star Lucy Flores.

(via wocinsolidarity)

Israel is keeping up a steady stream of attacks on the besieged Gaza Strip, killing 11 more Palestinians in its latest airstrikes.

The air raids targeted four different locations in the coastal enclave. Officials say two of the victims were killed when a strike hit a facility for the disabled in Beit Lahiya in northern Gaza. Israel has pounded more than one thousand targets in the impoverished region since Tuesday. 119 Palestinians, most of them women and children, have lost their lives. And about 800 others have been injured. Tel Aviv has now massed thousands of troops along the Gaza border in preparation for a possible ground incursion.

intlwomenshealth:

This week, Anne Firth Murray interviews Wu Qing:

Wu Qing is a well-known public figure, activist and English language professor in China. She taught English for 40 years, from 1960-2000. Before she retired, she was teaching English and American Studies at Beijing Foreign Studies University. During her term in the university, she was awarded Excellent Professor Award, Excellent Teacher Award twice from the Municipality of Beijing and Margaret Turner Award for Best Teacher teaching the basics many times. From 1977 to 1979, she was seconded to China Central Television (CCTV) to host the English on TV program and English on Sunday program, televised throughout China.

Since the mid-1980s, Professor Wu Qing has been actively promoting human rights and women’s rights. She was a member of Women’s Studies Forum, English Department, Beijing Foreign Studies University, from 1986 to 1995. She has served as a gender specialist with the Canadian International Development Agency since 1989. She became a People’s Deputy to the Haidian People’s Congress in 1984. She has received numerous awards, including the Ramon Magsaysay Award, presented by the government of the Philippines, been named an “Outstanding Individual of 2007” by the Changping District Education Committee, and a “Top Cover Personality” by the Chinese Senior Citizens’ magazine; and was nominated by the Schwab Foundation Network as one of the World’s Outstanding Social Entrepreneurs of 2003.

lgbtqblogs:

Jaxe Pan: Dear Mr Yaacob Ibrahim, Minister for Informaton, Communication and the Arts,

my daughter and I have a very close relationship. Even though there are only two of us, we are bonded in love and kinship and we are a real family. Together with many friends I know who are single parents, adopted parents, blended-family parents, homosexual men and women, we are real, and we live alongside other Singaporeans from traditional men-woman union, making the same contribution to our country.

By removing books not conforming to the prescribed family model, I fear that we are creating an artifical reality for our young children.

I fear that my daughter is denied the opportunity to learn the diversity of families and that she will grow to doubt her value as an individual.

I fear that other children would only recognise a singular family model, and regard my daughter as alien.

I fear this perpetuates intolerance and bigotry, which leads to isolation and discrimination.

I fear the outcome would be a society where children of different family circumstances would be mocked and bullied because others cannot relate to or understand their differences.

The German poet Heinrich Heine wrote, “Where they have burned books, they will end in burning human beings.”

And this, I fear most.

As a mother, I can teach my daughter to be brave and optimistic if ever being ridiculed about our family situation. As a mother, I can order any of these books online for her. But as a mother, I am powerless, alone, to change the society she would find herself in.

Consider this my feeble attempt, my fears as a mother and my aspiration as a citizen, to implore you to reconsider the censorship towards our children’s books, to make Singapore an inclusive society that has a heart as big as it needs to be, to hold all of our different families. #wearereal

The news: Companies with women in charge saw returns that beat the rest of the stock market, and there’s data to prove it.

A study from Fortune reveals that Fortune 1000 companies with female CEOs recorded an average return of 103.4% over the course of the female CEO’s tenure. That’s much higher than the 69.5% average return for the S&P 500 Index, which looks at the combined performance of the largest companies on the market.

pulitzercenter:

image

In Guatemala – the country with the highest rates of malnutrition in the Americas – roughly half of the nation’s children are “stunted” and experience slow growth, poor school performance and, later in life, lower economic productivity. Watch Roger Thurow and Hari Sreenivasan’s report here